Stolen gun linked to Terrance Franklin

New evidence doesnÂ’t change investigation that cleared officers in suspectÂ’s shooting

This Minneapolis Police photo shows the stolen handgun linked to Terrance Franklin. Credit: Submitted image
This Minneapolis Police photo shows the stolen handgun linked to Terrance Franklin. Credit: Submitted image

Minneapolis Police say DNA evidence links a stolen gun found beneath a house porch in October to Terrance Franklin, the 22-year-old shot and killed by police in May.

The 9mm Desert Eagle handgun was reported stolen, along with a television set, from a Northeast Minneapolis home May 9, one day before Franklin’s fatal confrontation with police in the basement of a Wedge neighborhood home. On the afternoon of May 10, Franklin, who police suspected in a different burglary, left a car on the 500 block of West 28th Street and fled on foot from police, who later found him about five blocks away hiding in the basement of a home on the 2700 block of Bryant Avenue South.

The home where the handgun was found Oct. 28 is located on the same block where Franklin left the vehicle on the day of the chase. It was wrapped in a black sock and wedged between the home’s back porch and foundation.

In a March 5 press conference announcing the discovery, Minneapolis Deputy Police Chief Kristine Arneson declined to say whether police believe the gun was stashed there May 10 and urged the public to “draw their own conclusions.” Arneson said the information was being shared for the sake of transparency.

Although the gun was found just more than four months earlier, the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension only recently completed its analysis of the evidence. Franklin’s DNA profile matched a sample taken from the sock, but neither his DNA nor his fingerprints were found on the gun itself, although Shannon Johnson, director of the Minneapolis police crime lab, said that was “not unusual.”

Arneson said the gun was loaded but had no bullets in the chamber.

Franklin was unarmed in the basement confrontation with police, but during a tussle with officers managed to pull the trigger on officer’s gun. SWAT team members Michael Meath and Ricardo Muro were shot in the legs. Franklin was shot 10 times.

In September, a grand jury cleared officers of wrongdoing in Franklin’s death. Arneson said Wednesday the gun “doesn’t change the case one bit.”